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2018 Animal Welfare Statement & FAQ

Respect for Animal Welfare

Respect for animal welfare is a cornerstone of Avon Products, Inc.'s product safety philosophy. Avon does not conduct animal testing to substantiate the safety of its products or ingredients and was the first major cosmetics company to end animal testing nearly 30 years ago.

However, China, one country in which we operate, legally requires animal testing on products it designates as “special use” -- such as sunscreens and deodorants -- sold in China, as well as ordinary cosmetics imported into China. The Chinese government conducts the tests at laboratories accredited by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration. Avon does not agree that China’s animal testing requirements are necessary to substantiate product safety and is committed to helping end China’s practice of animal testing on beauty products. Avon supports the development of alternatives to animal testing by working in partnership with scientific organisations that are developing new approaches to product safety evaluation that don’t use animals. Avon also works with personal care products industry associations to help advance government acceptance of non-animal testing methods with the goal of ending animal testing.

Avon is committed to minimising the number of its products requiring testing by the Chinese government. No Avon products that have been tested by China will be sold by any European or Latin-American Avon market by the end of 2018. Our goal is for no Avon products that have been tested by China to be sold by any Asia-Pacific Avon market other than China by the end of 2019.

FAQs

Does Avon test on animals?
No. Avon does not test on animals and was the first major cosmetic company to end animal testing nearly 30 years ago.

If Avon doesn’t test on animals, why does PETA include Avon on a list of companies that test on animals?
Although Avon does not test on animals, PETA includes Avon on its list of companies that sell beauty products in China. China legally requires animal testing on products it designates as “special use” -- such as sunscreens and deodorants -- sold in China, as well as ordinary cosmetics imported into China. The Chinese government conducts the tests at laboratories accredited by the Chinese Food and Drug Administration.

Are any of the Avon products tested in China sold in countries other than China?
No Avon products that have been tested by China will be sold by any European or Latin-American Avon market by the end of 2018. Our goal is for no Avon products that have been tested by China to be sold by any Asia-Pacific Avon market other than China by the end of 2019.

Why don’t Avon’s products carry a “cruelty-free” logo?
Once an Avon market no longer sells Avon products that have been tested by China, that Avon market will explore the options for cruelty-free logos on its products. No Avon products that have been tested by China will be sold by any European or Latin-American Avon market by the end of 2018. Our goal is for no Avon products that have been tested by China to be sold by any Asia-Pacific Avon market other than China by the end of 2019.

What is Avon doing to change China’s animal testing policy?
Avon does not agree that China’s animal testing requirements are necessary to substantiate product safety and is committed to helping end China’s practice of animal testing on beauty products. Avon supports the development of alternatives to animal testing by working in partnership with scientific organisations that are developing new approaches to product safety evaluation that don’t use animals. Learn more below in the Advancing Alternatives to Animal Testing section.

Which Avon products does the Chinese government test on animals?
China legally requires animal testing on products it designates as “special use” -- such as sunscreens and deodorants -- sold in China, as well as ordinary cosmetics imported into China.

Why doesn’t Avon stop selling products in China?
We are optimistic that Avon’s influence as a leading global cosmetics company can help advance the Chinese government’s acceptance of non-animal testing methods with the goal of ending animal testing. We work in partnership with scientific organisations that are developing new approaches to product safety evaluation that don’t use animals, as well as with personal care products industry associations. We are encouraged to see progress being made in negotiations with the Chinese authorities. For example, in 2014, China ended its animal testing requirement for many “ordinary cosmetics,” including make-up, skin, hair and nail care products and fragrances that are produced in China.

How does Avon ensure the safety of its products without animal testing?
The safety of Avon’s customers is of paramount importance and we substantiate the safety of our products in line with global and local regulations. We use non-animal testing methods such as applying existing data, computer modelling, and in vitro testing to ensure the safety of Avon-branded cosmetics products.

Advancing Alternatives to Animal Testing
Avon has long been committed to helping end animal testing of beauty products. For decades, Avon has supported the development of alternatives to animal testing.

Avon continues to support the development of alternatives to animal testing by supporting scientific organisations that are developing new approaches to product safety evaluation that don’t use animals. Avon also works with personal care products industry associations to help advance government acceptance of non-animal testing methods with the goal of ending animal testing of beauty products in China.

Highlights of Avon’s partnerships to advance alternatives to animal testing include:

Institute of InVitro Sciences (IIVS)
Avon scientists have long played an active role as members of the Scientific Advisory Panel of the Institute of InVitro Sciences (IIVS), a non-profit research and testing organisation dedicated to the advancement of non-animal testing methods worldwide. Avon also is a member of IIVS’s Industry Council for the Advancement of Regulatory Acceptance of Alternatives (ICARAA), a working group that promotes specific activities designed to accelerate the adoption of non-animal methods by government agencies such as the Chinese Food & Drug Administration. Learn more about IIVS’s work with China.

Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing at the John Hopkins University
Avon is a longstanding supporter of the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing at the John Hopkins University, which presented Avon with a Recognition Award for its dedication to the principles of the 3Rs (refinement, reduction and replacement) and the use of alternative tests for safety evaluation. Avon funded the Center’s first project on alternatives to animal use in contact allergy testing in 1988.

Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME)
In Europe, Avon has for many years supported the Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME) in the UK. FRAME is dedicated to the development of new and valid methods that will replace the need for laboratory animals in medical and scientific research, education, and testing.

European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA)
The European Partnership for Alternative Approaches to Animal Testing (EPAA) is a voluntary collaboration among the European Commission, European trade associations, and companies from seven industry sectors. The partners are committed to pooling knowledge and resources to accelerate the development, validation and acceptance of alternative approaches to animal use in regulatory testing. The overall aim is the replacement, reduction and refinement (3Rs) of animal use in regulatory testing.

Cosmetics Europe and the Personal Care Products Council
Cosmetics Europe and the Personal Care Products Council are the European and U.S. cosmetics and personal care industry associations, respectively, of which Avon is an active member. These industry associations are working with the Chinese authorities to explain how EU and US-based companies use non-animal methods to confirm the safety of their products, with the goal of ending this unnecessary practice in China.